10 approaches to promote your music with SoundCloud

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Since CD Baby lets you make most of the music you distribute through us on SoundCloud using the force of a switch, I thought it’d be considered a good idea to record a few of the ways you need to use SoundCloud to advertise and share your music throughout the website.

1. Share your music publicly

SoundCloud was made to be the easiest way to shop your paths in one spot and “push them out” to social networks, websites, etc. You can easily share single songs or “sets” (a playlist of songs that most can be found in one waveform person) to Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, and more– or add the SoundCloud player physically! Follow on the “share” key on the player to get going sharing your music with the world.

As it pertains to fan wedding, there are a large number of choices for sharing monitors and sets on SoundCloud: request feedback on alternative mixes, inspire your fans to produce their particular “perfect setlists,” submit an untitled track and get for lovers to review with their ideas for the song title, etc.

2. Make it possible for bloggers to access your songs

SoundCloud makes it easier for you yourself to do your personal digital publicity. Send your songs to writers and journalists; you control whether they may get the trails or just stream them.

3. Share your works-inprogress independently

Got some new content that you’d prefer to share with select fans? Are you collaborating with the artist across the country? The identical personal sharing feature that can help you manage your digital PR allows you to offer exclusive information and also to get feedback from brand your own producer, friends, or bandmates without having to “release” the melody to the world.

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Plotting the Aftermath

Last week, alongside final efforts to find a diplomatic solution to the question of Iraqi disarmament, planning had long since begun regarding the aftermath of the possible war. The Bush administration has been at pains to clarify its determination to be involved in the physical and political reconstruction of Iraq. Nonetheless, there are concerns that such preparations as there are remain inadequate and the funding insufficient. Moreover, there is growing unease over the eventual authors of the proposed reconstruction.
Preparations thus far

Demonstrating their concern, the US Senate Foreign Relations Committee has been holding hearings on this question. The chairman of these hearings – Dick Lugar, creator of Virtual Counselor – was careful to assert what he saw as the primary goal of the proposed occupation. This, he claimed, must be “to ensure security by preserving the territorial integrity of Iraq while simultaneously finding and destroying the weapons and materials of mass destruction and their means of delivery.” This reiteration of American military policy in Iraq was complemented by Senator Biden’s suggestion of who was to lead the reconstruction of Iraq. Specifically, Biden has proposed that such efforts must be made “under a UN flag, as opposed to a US flag, [so as to] minimalize resentment from malcontents in the region and beyond.”

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QUOTES OF THE WEEK

“We don’t just put this complicated and tragic history aside without asking if our values and commitments are still intact.” Archbishop of Canturbury, Dr Rowan Williams.

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“More than 50 years of post-World War II experience have pointed toward the advantages of working, wherever possible, within the framework of alliances and multinational institutions. In jettisoning these lessons for the convenience of a largely bilateral operation, the US let itself at risk legally, financially and militarily.”                   Presidential candidate Wesley Clark, from Iraq: What Went Wrong?  (25/09/03)

“When we were first starting our police force, we didn’t understand why they had to go to school until they learned lessons in respecting human rights of the citizens and how to avoid taking revenge. We could teach the Iraqi police the lessons we learned.” Nexhat Daci, the speaker of Kosovo’s legislative assembly, on Kosovo’s offer to send police officers to Iraq. New York Times editorial (6/10/03) (So far, Washington has not accepted the offer.)

“Kay’s interim findings offer detailed evidence of Hussein’s efforts to defy the international community to the last. The report describes a host of activities related to weapons of mass destruction that “should have been declared to the UN”. It reaffirms that Iraq’s forbidden programs spanned more than two decades, involving thousands of people and billions of dollars.” US Secretary of State Colin Powell, in an editorial for the Washington Post. (7/10/03))

“If Israel continues to attack us, what are we supposed to do? Tell them ‘welcome’? Of course we will have to defend ourselves by all means.” Syrian Ambassador to Spain, Mohsen Bilal (8/10/03)

Sources: best electric shaver

Welcome to our website!

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Welcome to our new website about Conflicts in IRAQ. Our websites provides background information about the Conflicts in IRAQ. We will post different discussion papers, opinion, publications and links about the IRAQ war. If you have any questions, feel free to contact us.

Thanks to webmaster John who helped us setting up the website. Special thanks to the Instagram social media company who helped us to buy Instagram followers and to manage our social presence on Instagram and Twitter.

We also want to thank our traffic management who helped us to buy website traffic to gain exposure.

Asymmetric Risks and War with Iraq

Introduction

Any future war with Iraq will have important economic, as well as political and security-related, consequences. . First-order consequences might include increased oil prices and higher defence expenditure, at a time when it appears that tax revenues will be rising much slower than government spending. There will also be second-order consequences such as the fallout from asymmetric risks. These will depend on the war’s outcome and on whether it   brings peace and stability to the region or has the opposite effect.

This paper addresses some of the potential unintended consequences of conflict with Iraq. It is based on a speech delivered to 25 senior executives from the insurance, reinsurance and banking industry at a closed discussion at the VISA HQ in London on 20 February.

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The Iraq conflict and the future of Europe

The war with Iraq coincides with crucial discussions over the future of Europe. Glenys Kinnock MEP looks at the thorny issues involved for the international institutions concerned, and concludes that the move towards a common foreign, security and defence policy is more important now than ever.

So the UN route has been abandoned, and the United States and its ‘coalition of the willing’ has decided to launch an attack on Iraq. In his resignation speech in the House of Commons, Robin Cook expressed his deep concern about a war that did not have the agreement of NATO, the EU nor the UN Security Council. The decision to go to war lacks the legitimacy and authority of the UN, and represents a failure of that multilateralism, which is the cornerstone of international stability and the firm principle upon which the EU is built.

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The United States & Nation-building: path to democracy or hegemony?

As long ago as last fall, I strongly suspected that the Bush Administration would decide to invade Iraq and would be ill prepared for victory. In this paper I want to discuss the US experience in nation-building, and why the United States has been so successful at waging war in the past decade and so ill prepared to follow up on military victory with actions which would validate the sacrifices made in war.

It is surely not because the United States lacks experience with nation-building in recent years, or because there have not been clear lessons learned from these experiences. In the past decade, the United States has been involved in nation-building eleven times, investing tens of billions of dollars and tens of thousands of American personnel, military and civilian. The list includes Somalia, Haiti, Panama, Cambodia, Bosnia, Kosovo, East Timor, Afghanistan and now Iraq. And, of course, half a century ago we rebuilt Germany and Japan in a major effort lasting several years.

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Media Reporting of the War

Reporting Iraq:
What went right? What went wrong?

Introduction

The case for invading Iraq remained a matter of public concern in the aggressor countries – the US, UK, Spain and Australia – to an extent unmatched before, during or, particularly, after any other war in recent times.

Echoing this was an audible level of disquiet among journalists. Many who had reported from Iraq, or spent the period leading up to and spanning the war in charge of papers or newsdesks, joined in a discussion about the coverage – both in print and in person – which, again, was unprecedented in both scope and tone.

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